Edmonton’s Token Naturals receives approval to extract and process cannabis

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Jeff Labine Keenan Pascal is the founder of Token Bitters and Token Naturals in Edmonton on February 17th, 2021. Ed Kaiser / Postmedia Photo by Ed Kaiser /.20092640A

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It took three years, but Edmonton’s Token Naturals will be able to manufacture liquid-filled cannabis products after approval from Health Canada.

The company received its standard processing license from the federal agency on April 9, which allowed it to advance the extraction and processing of cannabis at its Edmonton facility. There are also plans to wholesale products to licensed manufacturers and retailers.

The company mainly focuses on products such as oils, tinctures, topical products, vapes, and foods.

Token Naturals founder Keenan Pascal said it was rare and difficult to obtain such a license.

“We did a lot of research, advice, designing buildings, and that’s how we’ve been working for the past three years,” he said. “We designed the company to focus on Alberta, especially Edmonton. We were very passionate about building our capital and designing our building to ensure that the capacity could stay in Edmonton. We are very excited to bring manufacturing to Alberta. “

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Token Naturals currently has 15 employees, but Pascal said it plans to double that number within the year.

He said it was important to keep the company as local as possible, including making sure the majority of investors were Albertans.

Recreational use of cannabis has been legal in Canada since 2018 and was later expanded to include foods, extracts, and topical issues. In Alberta, individuals can purchase from private licensed retailers or through the government-operated online store. The cannabis market was also very competitive. There were 124 providers in Edmonton alone.

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Pascal said he plans to make his company stand out by focusing on liquid filling.

“There’s a lot of (cannabis) flour out there so we just looked downstream for ourselves,” he said. “Obviously there is extraction and that is already getting crowded. We looked at the next phase, where the extracted product is converted into finished consumer goods. We see a lot of possibilities. This is a very efficient way for us to get a return on our investment and fit into the market with a niche (product). “

Pascal said the company is working on getting other licenses to expand who they can sell to and to expand research and development. He assumes that the approval process for these licenses will only take a few months.

“We are excited about this new wave (in) the cannabis industry,” said Pascal. “The city of Edmonton was an amazing community. We … were able to create jobs and employ people through a pandemic and actually grow our business. We’re just so excited to be an Edmonton story. “

jlabine@postmedia.com

Twitter.com/jefflabine

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